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Darius Tuonianuo Mwingyine

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Research associate Research Group Prof. Tröger

 

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 Brief Profile and Research

 Abstract

 

 

Brief Profile and Research

Darius Tuonianuo Mwingyine is a PhD Candidate in the Geography Institute/ZEF, University of Bonn, Germany. He holds an M.Phil. in Land Management and B.Sc. in Land Economy from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. Darius is a Lecturer in the Department of Real Estate and Land Management, University for Development Studies, Ghana. His research interests include: land markets and land relations, land tenure, land use, livelihoods and environmental sustainability; climate variability, sustainable livelihoods, and rural development. His doctoral research is on Land Commodification and intergenerational relations in North-western Ghana.

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Abstract

EMERGENT LAND MARKET/COMMODIFICATION AND INTER-GENERATIONAL LAND RELATIONS IN NORTH WESTERN GHANA

Junior Researcher: Darius Tuonianuo Mwingyine

Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Sabine Troeger, Academic Advisor: Dr. Wolfram Laube

 

Land is the most vital natural resource upon which all human activities and livelihoods depend. In the developing world, especially in Africa, land is essential for food security and rural livelihoods, and a social security for many families. African land tenure has come under pressure due to growing land commodification especially under global influences, and thus poses a threat to secured livelihoods. In Ghana, land is held in communal ownership, and administered by chiefs, clan and family heads for and on behalf of their respective groups. Land commodification, as well as changing normative frameworks is accelerating, resulting in changing land relations in land owning groups. Land commodification is acute in peri-urban areas where agricultural lands are converted to urban based infrastructure. Under land commodification, changing customary norms and breakdown of the trusteeship ethos have tilted the benefits of land transactions mostly to chiefs and elders to the exclusion of the larger land owning group, resulting in landlessness, endemic poverty and general insecurity in peri-urban areas. Over the years, concerns over the fiduciary role of land custodians in land administration, and the security of the inheritance of the youth have been raised. Within the past two decades, peri-urban, north-western Ghana, especially in the Wa fringes, has been experiencing growing land commodification as agricultural land is being converted to residential, commercial and other urban infrastructure. The establishment of higher educational facilities, improved transport system and a growing economy are major contributing factors to this phenomenon. The main purpose of this study is to understand which are and were the driving forces behind emerging land commodification in Wa / northern-western region of Ghana today, and how this commodification transforms societal regulations, normative frameworks and altogether livelihood/food security of people in peri-urban contexts in the vicinity of the regional capital Wa. Using a case study of three communities, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, observation together with photography were employed to collect data on the development of land markets, land transactions, institutional changes and changing livelihood and aspirations, and their impact on intergenerational land relations, and food security. The major participants – source of information for the study - were the customary land owners, State Land Agencies, land purchasers, and some key informants. Literature review from mainly published articles, books and organisational reports were also key sources of data for the study. This study will provide critical policy direction for sustainable land administration, secured livelihoods and food security for land owner families, and other land users. The use of participatory tools in the data collection will offer participants the opportunity to reflect upon their own land administration systems and processes, and consequently take relevant measures towards improving upon family land relations and livelihoods.

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